Topics

Topics

Stay part of the CEPI community!

On May 25th 2018 the new EU data privacy legislation (GDPR) comes into force. CEPI will require your explicit opt-in if you wish to continue receiving updates from us such as event invitations, press releases, our newsletter (CEPI Members and Partners only) etc. To make you sure don’t miss out on updates from one of Europe’s most innovative industries or to subscribe for the first time please click below.

02 Mar.2016 ,

Circular Economy for paper: Better design and management guidelines

A World Economic Forum publication in collaboration with industry

The European paper industry was invited to collaborate with the World Economic Forum (the Forum), the Ellen MacArthur Foundation and the McKinsey Center for Business and Environment on Circular Economy to produce a white paper with guidelines on design and management for circularity. The new publication provides essential guidance to all actors in the supply chain through simple ecodesign rules for paper products, without limiting innovation and the introduction of new techniques. This is a product of the three pilots under Project MainStream, launched during the 2014 summit in Davos.

“We trust helping circular thinking in all steps of the complex value chain will help reach higher in what is already a high recycling performance”, said CEPI Sustainability Director Jori Ringman, one of the draftsmen of the guidance, in a panel discussion on the feasibility of higher recycling rates at the Packaging and Sustainability event in Brussels on Wednesday. “In circular economy, your downstream is your upstream and what you pass on into the loop will have an impact on your own business.”

Although highly recyclable, paper is usually converted by industries that add chemicals to it through printing inks and other auxiliary materials. This can lead to problems in subsequent circular chains, as these chemicals cannot easily be removed from the paper before re-entering the mill. Furthermore, the already highly-optimised recycling process cannot follow the speed of the evolution of inks and toners.

The publication summarises the key choices to be made by direct (printers, papermakers, collectors) and indirect (such as local authorities, ink producers, equipment manufacturers) stakeholders. More specifically, it identifies the choices that can influence businesses ordering a fibre-based product - printed paper, packaging or other.

“Businesses will have many priorities topping their agendas, such as meeting customer requirements, creating functionalities that meet both the purpose and profitability, and respecting environmental considerations”, says Ringman. “This document is meant to make decision-making in companies easier when balancing these priorities.”

You can view the publication at: http://bit.ly/1T7vLVb and download it at: http://bit.ly/1QqTqdt.

For more information, please contact Jori Ringman at j.ringman@cepi.org, mobile: +32 478 25 50 70.


Note to the Editor

Project MainStream is a collaboration between the World Economic Forum, the Ellen MacArthur Foundation and the McKinsey Center for Business and Environment, seeking to remove bottlenecks in the large-scale transitioning to the circular economy.

CEPI aisbl - The Confederation of European Paper Industries
The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) is a Brussels-based non-profit organisation regrouping the European pulp and paper industry and championing industry’s achievements and the benefits of its products. Through its 18 member countries (17 European Union members plus Norway) CEPI represents some 505 pulp, paper and board producing companies across Europe, ranging from small and medium sized companies to multi-nationals, and 920 paper mills. Together they represent 23% of world production.

 

 

Read more

26 Feb.2016 ,

EUTR implementation report fails to tackle loophole on printed products

CEPI, together with INTERGRAF (European Federation for Print and Digital Communication) published a press release commenting on the implementation report of the EU Timber Regulation (EUTR) published by the European Commission last week. Judging it as a missed opportunity, the two associations are disappointed that the inclusion of printed products is not recommended strongly enough in the regulation’s scope. CEPI and INTERGRAF urge the Commission once again to amend the annex of the EUTR and include products under the chapter 49 of the Combined Nomenclature. The non-inclusion of printed products will lead to circumvention. There is a risk that illegally-logged wood will be traded to countries with less stringent legal rules, before being traded to the EU.

Read our press release.

Read more about the EU Timber Regulation on the Commission website.

Read more

23 Feb.2016 ,

European Social Partners investigate skills and education needs for the paper industry

The European Paper Sector Social Partners welcomed more than 60 participants from all across Europe for a conference in Vienna to discuss the preliminary research results on the education and training systems and typical curricula relevant for the paper sector in Europe. This extensive research will build the foundation for a gap analysis that will be the second step towards policy recommendations to policy makers, training providers and industry.


“It is high time for us to tackle the challenge of potential future skills mismatches in our sector” said Peter Schuld, Vice-Chairman of the Paper Sector Social Dialogue Committee“. The analysis from key experts demonstrates that we urgently have to adapt to the technological developments and prepare for the transformation within our sector by providing the relevant skills.”


The pulp and paper industry is a sustainable and innovative sector with great potential in Europe, if it continues to look into the future of the sector and the skills needed. At the same time, it is facing an image and perception challenge that deters youngsters to join the industry workforce. This fundamental message was unanimously shared by the training and education experts as well as industry and trade union representatives at the mid-term conference of the European Paper Sector Social Partners’ project on the future skills and competences in their sector.


“Our sector is part of the bio-based industries and will remain competitive – a message that we have to broadly disseminate”, stated Bernard de Galembert, Chairman of the Paper Sector Social Dialogue Committee. “To overcome the lack of appeal, we need to develop identify targeted campaigns to address the general opinion and in particular youngsters and catch their interest for a highly innovative and sustainable sector.”


The project intends to deliver policy recommendations that will be available in November 2016.

For any further information, please contact:
industriAll Europe: Corinna Zierold corinna.zierold@industriall-europe.eu Tel +32 (0) 2 226 00 55,
CEPI: Bernard de Galembert b.degalembert@cepi.org Tel +32 (0) 2 627 49 27


The EU paper sector social dialogue brings together the paper workers and employers from the EU member States, represented by IndustriAll European Trade Union and CEPI.
 

Read more

19 Feb.2016 ,

Exported jobs, illegal timber: EUTR implementation report fails to tackle loophole on printed products

The implementation report of the EU Timber Regulation (EUTR) published yesterday is a missed opportunity. It does not recommend the inclusion of printed products strongly enough in the regulation’s scope.

Marco Mensink, CEPI Director General: “Not including printed products in the scope is wrong. Products printed and produced in Europe comply with EU law to be proven legal. Products printed outside Europe do not have to comply at all. This is very odd, as the risks of illegal logging are much larger in the regions exempted. The EU promotes printing outside Europe and exports jobs. We fail to understand why”.

Beatrice Klose, INTERGRAF Secretary General: “Illegal logging damages the reputation of printed products and the European Union must ensure that all products on the European market are safe from illegal logging. The only way to do this is to include printed products in the scope of the European Timber Regulation.”

The annex of the EUTR contains a list of timber and timber products under the scope of the regulation, but does not contain products under chapter 49 of the Combined Nomenclature i.e. printed products. This is inconsistent and should have been addressed more clearly in the report. CEPI and INTERGRAF urge the Commission once again to amend the annex of the EUTR and include products under the chapter 49 of the Combined Nomenclature.

In 2014 the volume of trade in printed products imports into the EU amounted to €3 billion. This greatly impacts our European industry from a competitive perspective. The non-inclusion of printed products will lead to circumvention: There is a risk that illegally-logged wood is traded to countries with less stringent rules on legality, before being traded to the EU.

Furthermore the paper and printing industries see a need for consistent enforcement among Member States and clearer guidance. However, the Commission’s vague reference to a possible expansion of the product scope is disappointing.


For more information, please contact:
• Ulrich Leberle, CEPI Raw Material Director at u.leberle@cepi.org or
• Laetitia Reynaud, Intergraf Policy Advisor on Economic and Environmental Issues at lreynaud@intergraf.eu

Note to the Editor

CEPI aisbl - The Confederation of European Paper Industries
The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) is a Brussels-based non-profit organisation regrouping the European pulp and paper industry and championing industry’s achievements and the benefits of its products. Through its 18 member countries (17 European Union members plus Norway) CEPI represents some 505 pulp, paper and board producing companies across Europe, ranging from small and medium sized companies to multi-nationals, and 920 paper mills. Together they represent 23% of world production. More at www.cepi.org

INTERGRAF
Intergraf represents 22 national printing federations in 20 countries in Europe. Intergraf's main task is to promote and protect the interests of the printing and related industries, working with the European Institutions, and to enhance the sector's competitiveness through lobbying, informing and networking. More at www.intergraf.eu


 

Read more

11 Feb.2016 ,

Consultation on the Review of Directive 2012/27/EU on Energy Efficiency

This consultation was launched to collect views and suggestions from different stakeholders and citizens in view of the review of Directive 2012/27/EU on energy efficiency (Energy Efficiency Directive or EED), foreseen for the second half of 2016. The full consultation replies can be found here.

Here are some highlights:

In reviewing the EU energy efficiency target for 2030, the Commission should have in mind that energy efficiency has to be achieved by voluntary initiatives, rather than by mandatory requirements. An EU-wide binding energy saving target until 2030 would limit the scope for economic room to manoeuvre. A rigid objective as a binding cap on energy consumption would impede growth. Therefore, it is of vital importance that the Commission designs the target in such a way that recognises early measures and focuses on lowering the energy intensity, not the energy use as such. The European framework has to create ideal long-term conditions to realize energy efficiency measures covering all sectors. This is particularly important for the non-ETS sectors, where incentives to improve energy efficiency are often insufficient. Effective incentives are needed, especially for research and development as well as for the cost-efficient implementation of investments in energy efficiency measures.

In view of achieving the new EU energy efficiency target for 2030, we believe that energy efficiency work must be done locally and as close to the energy consuming unit as possible. The role of the EU should therefore only be limited to setting targets, creating the overall regulatory framework, monitor the process in terms of energy efficiency improvements and give non-binding advice to those countries that are not able to reach the given goals. But details on how to implement energy efficiency policies need to be formulated at national or even industry level.
The EU should also promote and finance research and innovation in the field of energy and process technology to enable breakthrough technologies.

Regarding the most appropriate financing mechanisms to significantly increase energy efficiency investments in view of the 2030 target, it is important to find a high efficient way of financing. To make sure that the highest possible potential is tapped with the available amount of money, it is important to prefer energy investment funding for measures with high returns on investment. One way would be to support investment in form of cheap call money from a revolving fund for efficiency measures that would otherwise not take place without support. Ensuring that the invested money always returns to the fund (e.g. oney is paid back to the fund in the same rate as the energy savings pay back), allows multiple use of the available budget and therefore enables highest efficiency.
Interest-free loans to finance investments are also a way to achieve energy efficiency measures.
Tax decrease/benefit could also be envisaged if companies are participating in energy efficiency programs and achieving results.
Income from auctioning of emission rights should also be used to finance energy efficiency measures.

 

Read more